Tag Archives: Shannon DeAngelo

Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri

There’s a reason why The Importance of Being Earnest endures. Oscar Wilde’s 1895 farce about Victorian manners and polite society is funny – and so is the production that opened Thursday (Jan. 26) at the Cider Mill Playhouse in Endicott.

The actors use believable accents, and the physicality, facial expressions, blocking, pregnant pauses and character business, under the direction of Tom Kremer, all work to keep up the play’s engaging and entertaining...
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UPDATE: Additional performances have been added at 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday (Dec. 16 and 17). Call the Phelps at 722-4873.

Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri

For the third year, Jan DeAngelo & Co. and Studio 271 Productions have brought their original adaptation of A Christmas Carol to the Phelps Mansion Museum in Binghamton. The show, which runs through Sunday (Dec. 18), sold out rather quickly, so you will want to be on the alert for ticket sales next year. Read more

 

when-in-carthReviewed by Nancy Oliveri

When the Cider Mill Playhouse’s Artistic Director, Gail Belokur, commissioned hometown theatrical wunderkind Santino DeAngelo to write a farce, she knew exactly what she was doing. And, apparently, so does DeAngelo.

The playwright,/composer/lyricist/commercial producer, now based in New York, has already had his work seen in the Big Apple. His musical Foolerie won the New York Musical Festival's 2015 Next Link Project, and he has been mentioned...

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Reviewed by Therese Bohn The Cider Mill Playhouse is wrapping up its 39th season with the crowd-pleasing Thoroughly Modern Millie, and what a caper it is! Millie (Maureen Edwards) arrives in Manhattan looking as innocent as Mary Pickford, but under her yellow pinafore and ringlets, she’s determined to be a thoroughly modern woman of 1922. She raises her skirt and bobs her hair, but will she succeed in marrying her rich boss? That’s the heart of the Dick Scanlan/Richard Henry Morris/Jeanine Tesori musical,a madcap romp of dizzy romance and devious...
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Reviewed by Tony Villecco

Federico Garcia Lorca was one of the true literary wonders of the 20th century, his life cut short by Spain’s Civil War of 1936 when he was brutally assassinated. More tragic than his death perhaps is the fact we will never know what literary output would have been forthcoming. Lorca himself stated he was still learning his craft and that his work "ha" just begun." We can, however, rejoice that his poetry and plays are still being presented.  A new translation...
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