Tag Archives: Shakespeare

By Barb Van Atta For centuries, theater companies have used ethnic makeup to alter the race of Caucasian performers. This tradition, however, does not align with the racial and cultural sensitivities of the 21st century. Thus, in recent weeks, the New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players canceled a staging of The Mikado after facing stinging online criticism for the use of "yellowface" in promotional material for a production featuring primarily non-Asian performers (for New York Times coverage, visit http://tinyurl.com/ngaj4ej). Similarly, complaints arose when Metropolitan Opera promotional material...
Read more
Reviewed by George Basler On his death bed, the famous actor Edmund Kean reportedly said, “Dying is easy; comedy is hard.” That’s especially true with the comedies of William Shakespeare, which are filled with references and language that had Elizabethan audiences rolling in the aisles but are about as funny as an IRS audit to today’s theater-goers. So credit goes to the Ti-Ahwaga Community Players for taking on the challenge with their latest production, As You Like It, which opened last week at the Ti-Ahwaga Performing Arts Center in...
Read more
Reviewed by Lory Martinez A clever bilingual adaptation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream opened last weekend in the Watters Theater of Binghamton University's Fine Arts Building, presented by BU's Theatre Department in conjunction with Chile's Duoc Universidad Catolica. Directors Tom Kremer and Rodrigo Nunez have collaborated successfully to present a Spanish/English version of this classic farce of fairies, love spells and hilarious misunderstandings during one midsummer night. Now, I’ll admit, I was a bit apprehensive when I heard the famous comedy would be performed in two languages. As a native...
Read more
Reviewed by Nicholas Linnehan I was very eager to see EPAC's summer Shakespeare production, The Tempest, at Endicott's George W. Johnson Park. It's my favorite Shakespearean work -- I love how it explores fantasy, spirituality and forgiveness -- so my expectations were high, and they were well met. Director Tim Mollen offered a unique interpretation of this work, blending modern music without losing the classical style of the play. He simply brought together old and contemporary life, giving us the best of both worlds. There were several stunning moments...
Read more
Reviewed by Kellie Powell
The Binghamton University Theatre Department recently presented an all-female version of Shakespeare's "Henry V," directed by visiting assistant professor Michael F. Toomey. Countless directors have attempted to "shake up Shakespeare" by changing time periods and locations, using color-blind casting and experimenting with gender roles, usually with mixed results -- and this production is no exception. "Henry V," which is probably most famous for King Henry's "band of brothers" speech, is a fairly macho play. To their credit, rather than impersonating men, members of BU's all-female cast played characters -- kings, soldiers, drunks...
Read more