Tag Archives: Jake Wentlent

Reviewed by George Basler The recipe for a good farce is a simple one: Put some outlandish characters in outlandish situations, and mix well. Pulling it off, though, is no simple task. Get any of the ingredients slightly wrong, and the soufflé crashes, and the pudding doesn’t set. Alan Ayckbourn’s 1979 farce, Taking Steps, which opened last weekend (Feb. 2-4) at the Cider Mill Stage in Endicott, is a case in point. The production, presented by the Clocktower Theater Company, has its share of chuckles and laughs. But, despite a...
Read more

Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri

There’s a reason why The Importance of Being Earnest endures. Oscar Wilde’s 1895 farce about Victorian manners and polite society is funny – and so is the production that opened Thursday (Jan. 26) at the Cider Mill Playhouse in Endicott.

The actors use believable accents, and the physicality, facial expressions, blocking, pregnant pauses and character business, under the direction of Tom Kremer, all work to keep up the play’s engaging and entertaining...
Read more

Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri

AnyVanyaone even remotely familiar with the body of work by Russian playwright Anton Chekov (1860 - 1904) will recognize three of the four names in the title of the Cider Mill Playhouse’s latest show. “Vanya” and “Sonia” (from Uncle Vanya) and “Masha” (from The Seagull) will ring a bell, but the fourth, decidedly slangy name, “Spike,” will not.  You will not have seen a “Spike” type...

Read more
Reviewed by Lory Martinez A clever bilingual adaptation of Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream opened last weekend in the Watters Theater of Binghamton University's Fine Arts Building, presented by BU's Theatre Department in conjunction with Chile's Duoc Universidad Catolica. Directors Tom Kremer and Rodrigo Nunez have collaborated successfully to present a Spanish/English version of this classic farce of fairies, love spells and hilarious misunderstandings during one midsummer night. Now, I’ll admit, I was a bit apprehensive when I heard the famous comedy would be performed in two languages. As a native...
Read more
Reviewed by Lory Martinez Elizabeth Mozer’s Binghamton University directorial debut, Dead Man’s Cell Phone by Sarah Ruhl, follows a woman named Jean (Christina Catechis), who finds — what else? — the phone belonging to Gordon, a dead man, and begins to answer it. She meets his mistress (Jacobella Luongo); his mother, Mrs. Gottlieb (Sarah Lees); his brother, Dwight (Rob Tendy); his wife, Hermia (Arshia Panicker) and his organ-trafficking business associate, “the stranger” (also played by Luongo). On the surface, this is a situational comedy about a woman who keeps...
Read more
Reviewed by Lee Shepherd Stamp collecting -- it ain’t just the beloved pastime of geezers and geeks. If you don’t believe philately isn't simply an innocent hobby, but something far more sinister, you must see Mauritius, presented by the Binghamton University Theatre Department. (more…)...
Read more
Reviewed by Sarah Kuras Throughout my years as a student, both undergraduate and graduate, I have seen many Binghamton University theater productions. Never have I seen such a creative, whimsical and hysterical show as the current  presentation of Alice in Wonderland. (more…)...
Read more