Tag Archives: Heidi Weeks

Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri Flying, by Sheila Cowley, is a five-person tour de force of superb acting. A runner-up for the University of South Carolina’s Todd McNerney Playwriting Award, a nationally held contest, the play had its world premiere Friday night (May 26) at the Chenango River Theatre in Greene. The play is set in West Texas at the end of World War II. In two pin-dropping acts, it tells the story of a flying ace and hero,...
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Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri

There’s a reason why The Importance of Being Earnest endures. Oscar Wilde’s 1895 farce about Victorian manners and polite society is funny – and so is the production that opened Thursday (Jan. 26) at the Cider Mill Playhouse in Endicott.

The actors use believable accents, and the physicality, facial expressions, blocking, pregnant pauses and character business, under the direction of Tom Kremer, all work to keep up the play’s engaging and entertaining...
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Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri

AnyVanyaone even remotely familiar with the body of work by Russian playwright Anton Chekov (1860 - 1904) will recognize three of the four names in the title of the Cider Mill Playhouse’s latest show. “Vanya” and “Sonia” (from Uncle Vanya) and “Masha” (from The Seagull) will ring a bell, but the fourth, decidedly slangy name, “Spike,” will not.  You will not have seen a “Spike” type...

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Reviewed by George Basler Jon Robin Baitz's Other Desert Cities asks some provocative questions: When does truth-telling carry a cost that is too painful to bear? When does artistic freedom mean betrayal? Should some secrets stayed buried? It offers no easy answers, but it does provide an absorbing evening of theater. The play was nominated for a Tony Award and named as a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize. The recognition is well-deserved. Baitz’s play skillfully mixes intensely emotional moments with some brittle humor. The production, which opened last...
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[caption id="attachment_3313" align="alignleft" width="106"] Heidi Weeks, Jim Hull[/caption] By George Basler The night of Jan. 12, 1955, was one that changed Rod Serling's life. On that night, his teleplay, "Patterns," appeared on the Kraft Television Theatre during what is  now called "the Golden Age" of live television. The play, which focuses on psychological bloodletting in the corporate boardroom, was an immediate smash hit and won Serling the first of his six Emmy Awards, said Larry Kassan,...
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