Tag Archives: Dvorak

Reviewed by Lee Shepherd Listening to orchestra musicians play a work they genuinely love imparts a special freshness, enthusiasm and sense of discovery to those lucky enough to be in the audience. While Dvorak's Symphony No. 9, the New World Symphony, is programed so often that it runs the risk of sounding hackneyed, Sunday’s performance (Feb. 7) by the Binghamton Philharmonic Orchestra, part of a concert titled “Dvorak and the New World,” was incredibly fresh and exciting. Fresh because Dvorak's melodic gifts, as well as his ability to...
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Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri Before a nearly full house last Saturday (May 3), the Binghamton Community Orchestra presented "Invitation to the Dance," a jubilant program of lively, compelling orchestral pieces for its third and final 2013–2014 concert. The program at Sarah Jane Johnson Memorial United Methodist Church in Johnson City was led by guest conductor Brian DeMaris, who is in consideration for the position of permanent BCO conductor. Works by Czechoslovakian composer Antonin Dvorak opened and closed the program, setting the tone with Slavonic Dances, No. 1 and concluding...
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Reviewed by Lee Shepherd The audience at Binghamton University's Anderson Center had a "hot time in the old town" Sunday afternoon (Jan. 26) when the Binghamton Philharmonic burned up the stage with steamy, smoldering and passionate renditions of Piazzolla's Tangazo, Bruch's Scottish Fantasy, Op. 46 and Dvorak's Symphony No. 7. To add to the romance , the young German violinist Sabrina-Vivian Hopcker (who apparently just goes by her first name) added her fire and temperament to the Bruch work, a piece of music that entranced her as...
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American violinist Soovin Kim was featured soloist as the Binghamton Philharmonic Orchestra performed Antonín Dvo?ák’s “Violin Concerto in A-minor, op. 53” on Saturday, April 2, at Binghamton University’s Anderson Center. It was a convincing demonstration of endurance in a composition uncharacteristically demanding of both bowing and fingering for long periods of time throughout its 32 minutes. The solo violin seemed to rise smoothly out of the ensemble, the orchestra deferring to the virtuoso’s cadenza passages, then just as smoothly ramping up again. The performance was met with an enthusiastic standing ovation from the full house.

The program opened with John Mackey’s Redline Tango and concluded with Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade, showing off many individual artists in the orchestra.

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