Broome Arts Mirror

By Matthew Pitcher The Binghamton art scene has been flourishing recently thanks to local artists trying to make a name for themselves. Adam Schultz is doing just that this month with exhibits at both the Whole in the Wall restaurant, 43 S. Washington St., and the recently opened café Strange Brew, 137 Washington St. His artwork complements the atmosphere of both locations and gives him the opportunity to share his talent with the community. Adam Schultz, Hole in the Wall   Read more
Editor's note: A BAMirror reviewer was unable to attend Hamlet. Fortunately, BCAC Executive Director Laura Knochen-Davis was in the audience during opening weekend (April 29-May 1). By Laura Knochen-Davis “To thine own self be true” is one of many familiar lines from William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, being performed through Sunday (May 8) in Watters Theater at Binghamton University. That may have been a guiding principle for director Anne Brady, who decided to utilize an imagined contemporary Denmark with costumes and weapons that the audience could relate to in...
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It's such a busy time right now with so many arts organizations winding up their seasons. I thought it would be a perfect opportunity to revive our readers' query: "What did you do in the arts this week?". On Friday, I heard a lovely concert by the combined vocal ensembles of SUNY Broome. On Sunday, I caught the really fine Tri-Cities Opera production of one of my favorite Broadway shows, Sweeney Todd. How about you?

-- Barb Van Atta, BAMirror Editor

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Reviewed by Sherri Strichman Tri-Cities Opera's Sweeney Todd opened last night (April 29) at The Forum to the enthusiastic reception of the audience. This dark musical thriller by Stephen Sondheim (book by Hugh Wheeler) is a departure from TCO's standard operatic fare, yet it seemed to be the largest house in attendance since I began reviewing performances here. The story: A wrongfully convicted barber, Benjamin Barker, returns to London. He’d had a beautiful wife whom he loved, and the judge who desired her had him transported to a penal...
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Editor’s note: BAMirror’s Lee Shepherd usually reviews Binghamton Philharmonic Orchestra concerts. Last weekend, however, she was a participant in a BPO performance. Here are her reflections: By Lee Shepherd Joy and brotherhood -- that's what Beethoven's Ninth Symphony is all about, and that's what we experienced singing the massive choral and orchestral work with the Binghamton University Chorus and Binghamton Philharmonic Orchestra in front of a sold-out crowd last Saturday (April 16) at The Forum in Binghamton. Months of preparation went into the concert, with excellent coaching from Bruce...
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Reviewed by George Basler As the play Red opens, Mark Rothko is an aging artistic lion at the height of his powers and renown. But he’s not a happy man. “We’re a smirking nation under the tyranny of the fine,” he sneers at one point before adding, “We are anything but fine.” The peek into Rothko’s innate despair is one of the key plot points of Red, which opened this past weekend (April 14-17) at the Cider Mill Playhouse in Endicott. The intelligent, well-acted production asks questions about artistic integrity...
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Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri

It’s not what you know; it’s who you know. This is what we tend to tell people who are trying to break into anything that will make them famous or successful, however they define it. And it’s one of the themes in Theresa Rebeck’s dialogue-rich two-act play, Seminar, about four young writers and their older, possibly wiser but definitely jaded, privately hired writing professor.  Joanna Patchett plays Kate, a comparatively wealthy young woman who hosts a 10-week writing seminar...
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