Broome Arts Mirror

By Lee Shepherd

Saturday’s “Unlimited Wonders” concert (March 18) at The Forum with the Binghamton Philharmonic Orchestra and the Madrigal Choir of Binghamton afforded me, a choir member, an orchestra-side view of concert preparation rarely seen by audiences.

Daniel Hege, interim conductor for the 2016-17 season, is a first-rate talent, both as an instrumental and vocal conductor.

He programs diverse and interesting concerts, a mix of beloved warhorses and new...

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By Barb Van Atta The Broome County Arts Council (BCAC) is awarding $231,246 in United Cultural Fund (UCF) grants for 2017. General operating grants will help support operations of seven major arts organizations. Seventeen project grants will support projects by community non-profits and individual artists. The recipients were to be honored at a press conference Tuesday (March 14), followed by a “Pi Day” celebration and fund-raising event at the Water Street Brewing Co. in downtown Binghamton. The press conference has been canceled due to the impending blizzard, but...
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By Nancy Oliveri

A community-wide NEA Big Read program promoting reading and literacy is running throughout March and this weekend will include a compelling stage adaptation of the featured book.

SUNY Broome Professor Mary Donnelly has been the force behind bringing this program to our community. Said Donnelly, “The Big Read is a program from the National Endowment for the Arts and Arts Midwest, which sponsors programming in local communities to help everyone gather around a good book.”

For our...

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Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri

When Andrea Gregori wrote her bucket list, there was something she definitely wanted to cross off of it: the chance to play Eliza Doolittle in a fully staged production of Lerner and Loewe’s My Fair Lady.

Now she can.

Gregori’s Theatre Street Productions has collaborated with the Endicott Performing Arts Center and its Executive Director, Patrick Foti, to bring the show to life. The group has been in...

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Reviewed by George Basler Put simply, Thorton Wilder’s The Skin of Our Teeth is a play you’ll either love or hate. Written in 1939, and first performed in 1942, the tragicomedy totally rejects naturalism (some would say logic) for abstraction, allegory and absurdity. In short, it’s one of the most bizarre, and polarizing, mainstream dramas ever produced on the American stage. The play was a hit when it first opened on Broadway and won the Pulitzer Prize for drama. But time has not been kind. The Skin of...
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Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri

A capable ensemble cast of eight occupies the Watters Theatre stage for the Binghamton University Theatre department’s production of A Lie of the Mind.

Sam Shepard's three-act psychological drama provides a great vehicle for the acting talents of its cast, and it has more laughs than I expected for a story of two seriously damaged families.

Thinking that he’s killed his young, beautiful wife, Beth, Jake is driven to a kind...

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Reviewed by Sherri Strichman Last night (Feb. 17) Tri-Cities Opera-goers were treated to seemingly unconnected works, written by two seemingly unconnected composers from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The result was a well-received double bill, brilliantly conceived, produced and performed. The first half of the evening was devoted to the cabaret songs, or Brettl-Lieder, of Arnold Schoenberg. For those who are panic-stricken by the composer’s very name, fear not.  These are from his late romantic period, before he went all 12-tonal.  They are beautifully lyrical pieces...
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