Broome Arts Mirror

Reviewed by Sherri Strichman Last night (Feb. 17) Tri-Cities Opera-goers were treated to seemingly unconnected works, written by two seemingly unconnected composers from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The result was a well-received double bill, brilliantly conceived, produced and performed. The first half of the evening was devoted to the cabaret songs, or Brettl-Lieder, of Arnold Schoenberg. For those who are panic-stricken by the composer’s very name, fear not.  These are from his late romantic period, before he went all 12-tonal.  They are beautifully lyrical pieces...
Read more
Reviewed by George Basler Over the past 24 years, Binghamton’s KNOW Theatre has established a solid reputation for presenting provocative and/or less well-known plays. Its latest production, Of the Fields, Lately, which opened this past weekend (Feb. 10-12), certainly fits that bill. The slice-of-life family drama, set in 1961, was written by Canadian playwright David French, who, I acknowledge, I had never heard of before. It’s one in a cycle of five, semi-autobiographical plays about the Mercer family, a solidly working-class family from Newfoundland, now living in Toronto. As...
Read more

Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri

Six women’s lives play out in a Louisiana beauty parlor in Steel Magnolias, a two-act play by Robert Harling that was made into a star-studded film in 1989. I've never seen the movie, but I found the stage version  engaging, as directed by Lorraine Tennant and Matt Gaska at the Endicott Performing Arts Center.

Over the course of nearly three years, at the end of the big hair decade of the...

Read more
By Chris Bahr A wonderful collection of prints and drawings from the 1920s through the 1940s opened Jan. 26 at Binghamton University to a very appreciative and rather sizeable crowd. "Works on Paper Between the Wars" highlights nearly 100 of the approximately 400 works on paper donated to the University Art Museum last year by local collectors Gil and Deborah Williams. (more…)...
Read more
Reviewed by Tony Villecco On Tuesday (Feb. 1), Binghamton University’s Anderson Center presented the Five Irish Tenors to what appeared to be a capacity audience. Singing everything from traditional Irish balladry to pop and light rock, the five men proved they were not only gifted but fun to watch, often interjecting bits of humor and comradery. The concert featured both ensemble and solo work by David Martin, Morgan Crowley, Ciarán Kelly, Alan Leech and George Hutton, supported by two very gifted pianists, Conor Linehan, also the music director and arranger, and Cathal...
Read more

Reviewed by Nancy Oliveri

There’s a reason why The Importance of Being Earnest endures. Oscar Wilde’s 1895 farce about Victorian manners and polite society is funny – and so is the production that opened Thursday (Jan. 26) at the Cider Mill Playhouse in Endicott.

The actors use believable accents, and the physicality, facial expressions, blocking, pregnant pauses and character business, under the direction of Tom Kremer, all work to keep up the play’s engaging and entertaining...
Read more
Reviewed by George Basler The musical 1776 originally opened on Broadway in the midst of the Vietnam War and the hippie era exemplified by Hair, which was running just down the block. The timing meant the show got labeled as a square peg in the round hole of a turbulent era. But while other artifacts of the era -- such as love beads, Nehru jackets and even Hair itself -- now seem comically dated, 1776 retains its freshness and relevancy. S.R.O Productions III’s crisp, well-acted production, which opened Jan....
Read more