Broome Arts Mirror

Reviewed by Sherri Strichman Sunday afternoon (Oct. 15), Tri-Cities Opera treated its audience at The Forum to an excellent production of Puccini's La Boheme. If the object was to fill seats by having only one, well-done performance of a popular opera from the standard repertoire, the company succeeded. The entire cast was solid in its singing and acting, and the performance quality was heightened in every scene by the rapport among the characters. The four young men in their Parisian garret – Jordan Schreiner as Rodolfo, Scott...
Read more
The Binghamton Theatre Organ Society will dedicate its 2017-2018 season to its founder and volunteer executive director, Paul F. Stapel, who passed away recently. Stapel, a native of Muskegon, Michigan, came to this community to serve as executive director of the Binghamton Symphony Orchestra (now the Binghamton Philharmonic) from 1983 to 1986.  He later was instrumental in the merger of the Art Theater and Art Mission to become the ART Mission and Theater and was its first executive director. Read more
Reviewed by George Basler The Glass Menagerie is a play bathed in melancholy and misconception. As one of the main characters tells the audience in the first scene, “I give you truth in the pleasant disguise of illusion.” But “the pleasant disguise” is left in pieces by the end of the heartbreaking play that is generally considered the first major work of the playwright Tennessee Williams. The play’s greatness is on full display in the Ti-Ahwaga Community Players’ production, which opened this past weekend (Oct. 6-8) and will run...
Read more
Reviewed by Lee Shepherd I sat glued to every moment of Ken Burns' masterful documentary The Vietnam War, then capped it off by attending opening night (Friday, Sept. 29) of Chenango River Theatre's powerful production of The Speed of Darkness. "Gripping" describes both documentary and play. They go glove-in-hand, both revealing secrets that cry out to see the light of day. The Speed of Darkness by Steve Tesich received its world premiere in 1989 at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, and had its Broadway premiere two years later....
Read more
Reviewed by Art Garrison They've issued 11 albums, performed at a Super Bowl halftime show and been together for 24 years ... and on Saturday, Sept. 16, they were in Homer. The members of Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, resplendent in their 1940s garb, took the stage at the Center for the Arts in Homer with a concert that had some dancing in the aisles. The band was promoting its 11th album, named Louie, Louie, Louie for the three artists whose music is featured: Louis Jordan, Louis Prima and,...
Read more
Reviewed by George Basler The Nance, which opened this past weekend (Sept.  8-10) at KNOW Theatre in downtown Binghamton, is an extremely funny send-up of old-fashioned burlesque shows, filled with routines that were old when your grandfather was in knickers. The play is also a touchingly sad character study as the life of its main character crumbles through self-delusion and self-loathing. These two aspects may seem an odd combination -- like mixing cherry soda with vinegar -- but a superb cast pulls it off in a terrific production...
Read more
Reviewed by Lee Shepherd Take heart, blue grass fiddlers: You CAN go from a square dance in the barn to Carnegie Hall. Tessa Lark, featured violin soloist at the Binghamton Philharmonic's Saturday night concert (Sept. 9), proves it. Rare for a classical concert artist, the native Kentuckian calls herself a "crossover musician," who enjoys every kind of music from classical to jazz to folk. She's an alumna of Mark O'Connor's fiddle camp, but she also played classical music at age 16 in Carnegie Hall's "Distinctive Debuts" program. Lark demonstrated...
Read more