Broome Arts Mirror

Reviewed by Lee Shepherd The Binghamton Philharmonic Orchestra’s concert Saturday (April 18)  at Binghamton University – dubbed “Framed Artistry” -- offered a gripping and exciting armchair adventure tour of Iran, Spain and Russia. No passport required! All the works were “programmatic,” that is, evoking scenes and places, with “you are there” veracity. Not often are Binghamton audiences treated to a world premiere of a world-class composition – in this case, Esther by Iranian-American Behzad Ranjbaran, who is on the faculty of the Juilliard School of Music. “It’s a...
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Reviewed by Lee Shepherd Craig Phillips is a distinguished organist and composer of organ and choral music. If anyone had any doubt about that, they weren’t after his concert Sunday afternoon (April 19) at Binghamton’s United Presbyterian Church, where he played to a select, but appreciative audience. Philips, who hails from Hollywood, Calif., was joined in the organ loft by violinist Uli Speth, concertmaster of the Binghamton Philharmonic, and flautist Georgetta Maiolo, recently retired from the BPO, to perform his Scenes from a Gallery (2009). The suite...
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stageKissReviewed by Nancy Oliveri I got the feeling while trying to follow the action in the Cider Mill Playhouse’s production of Stage Kiss, that playwright Sarah Ruhl has more than a few gripes about theater people. She takes swipes at writers, actors and directors, painting most of them as the jerks she must have encountered from time to time in her own theatrical experience. Why any company would want to lift that veil is beyond me, but the challenge is...
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Reviewed by Sherri Strichman Tri-Cities Opera’s final production of the season, Gounod's Faust, opened last night (April 17) to great audience approval, some of it well-deserved. The opera is adapted from Goethe’s tale of an aged scholar who has become so jaded with life that he has nothing to live for. He makes a deal with the devil for youth and new experiences.  This production, conducted by Thomas Muraco, was directed by Martha Collins with scenic design by Wally Coberg, lighting design by Douglas Macur, original costume design...
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Reviewed by George Basler Photo journalist Sarah Goodwin (Amoreena Wade) has returned to her Brooklyn apartment with physical injuries and emotional scars from covering her latest war overseas. James Dodd (Eric Michael Patten), her writer boyfriend, is nursing her back to health while suffering from his own sense of burnout and guilt for leaving her alone in a war zone. Their interaction forms the basis for Time Stands Still, Donald Margulies’ provocative and compelling play that is receiving an excellent production at the KNOW Theatre in Binghamton. Wade and...
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Reviewed by Patrick Hao: The Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice is a story of love, music and ultimately death. Those universal themes resonate throughout civilizations and cultures, making the story malleable to different cultures; from Stravinsky’s ballet, Orpheus, in 1948 to the Oscar-winning Marcel Camus film, Black Orpheus, set in the favela of Rio de Janeiro. The Anderson Center this weekend presents their version of Orpheus, this time set in an African village and like the adaptations before them, this dance show is a vibrant...
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Editor’s note: Today is your last chance to see Timbuktu at the Art Theater … and your first chance to read a review by BAMirror’s newest writer, Patrick Hao of Binghamton University. Reviewed by Patrick Hao In the opening scene of Abderrahmane Sissako’s Academy Award-nominated film, Timbuktu, the fundamentalist Islamic group Anser Dine is chasing a doe in their truck with heavy firearms, shooting occasionally. One of the members says, “Don’t shoot to kill. We want to tire it out first.” That quote is indicative of what Sissako...
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