About: Sharon Ball

Recent Posts by Sharon Ball

The Broome County Arts Council (BCAC),  has awarded $239,575 in United Cultural Fund (UCF) grants this year to 21 local arts organizations, community non-profits, and individual artists.  BCAC announced the funding at a March 12th news conference at its 5th floor gallery space at 81 State Street in downtown Binghamton.   2015 UCF grants will help support the operations of 7 major arts organizations, as well as 13 community non-profit and individual artist projects. Funded projects range from choral music to dance, classes to concerts, photography...
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A Note from Sharon Ball, Executive Director, Broome County Arts Council:  Our 10th Heart of the Arts Awards Celebration on Monday (Sept. 22)  featured a special and very moving Memorial Roll Call researched, written and presented by Broome Arts Mirror Editor Barb Van Atta.   We wanted to share it with you: (more…)...
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I like cemeteries, especially the old ones.  They're time machines, filled with artwork and stories. I'm as  curious about the people who carved grave monuments as  I am about those who lie beneath and around them. On a recent sunny Saturday,  I got a chance to ride through Spring Forest Cemetery, off Mygatt Street in Binghamton.   One stone read "Died at Age 70" with a death date of 1845.  That meant she -- it was the grave of a woman --  was born  in 1775, one...
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Award-winning composer Marvin Hamlisch was scheduled to conduct a performance of his music with the Binghamton Philharmonic late last month.  The show would have taken place at the Anderson Center for the Performing Arts on the Binghamton University campus.  But about a week before the much-anticipated show, word came that Mr. Hamlisch could not travel due to a fall.  Today (August 7) came the news that Mr. Hamlisch has died.  He leaves a singular legacy of glorious music.  Read more and listen to NPR's appreciation at: http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2012/08/07/158364635/marvin-hamlisch-movie-and-broadway-composer-has-died...
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At some early point in his long career, more than three decades of it spent at TIME, Robert Hughes became the most famous art critic in the English-speaking world. This happened because he was also the best — the most eloquent, the most sharp-eyed and incisive, the most truculent and certainly the most robust. He was 74 when he died on Aug. 6, in New York City. As Auden put it after the death of Yeats: “Earth, receive an honoured guest.”    Read more at: http://entertainment.time.com/2012/08/07/the-art-of-being-critical-robert-hughes-1938-2012/#ixzz22uQtf8V3...
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